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9 definitions found

From: DICT.TW English-Chinese Dictionary 英漢字典

 till /ˈtɪl/
 直到,在…以前,迄(conj.)直到…為止(vt.)耕种放錢的抽屜,備用現金

From: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913)

 Till, v. i. To cultivate land.
 

From: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913)

 Till n.  A vetch; a tare. [Prov. Eng.]

From: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913)

 Till, n.  A drawer. Specifically: (a) A tray or drawer in a chest. (b) A money drawer in a shop or store.
 Till alarm, a device for sounding an alarm when a money drawer is opened or tampered with.

From: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913)

 Till, n.
 1. Geol. A deposit of clay, sand, and gravel, without lamination, formed in a glacier valley by means of the waters derived from the melting glaciers; -- sometimes applied to alluvium of an upper river terrace, when not laminated, and appearing as if formed in the same manner.
 2. A kind of coarse, obdurate land.

From: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913)

 Till, prep.  To; unto; up to; as far as; until; -- now used only in respect to time, but formerly, also, of place, degree, etc., and still so used in Scotland and in parts of England and Ireland; as, I worked till four o'clock; I will wait till next week.
    He . . . came till an house.   --Chaucer.
 Women, up till this
 Cramped under worse than South-sea-isle taboo.   --Tennyson.
    Similar sentiments will recur to every one familiar with his writings -- all through them till the very end.   --Prof. Wilson.
 Till now, to the present time.
 Till then, to that time.

From: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913)

 Till conj. As far as; up to the place or degree that; especially, up to the time that; that is, to the time specified in the sentence or clause following; until.
    And said unto them, Occupy till I come.   --Luke xix. 13.
    Mediate so long till you make some act of prayer to God.   --Jer. Taylor.
    There was no outbreak till the regiment arrived.   --Macaulay.
 Note:This use may be explained by supposing an ellipsis of when, or the time when, the proper conjunction or conjunctive adverb begin when.

From: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913)

 Till, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Tilled p. pr. & vb. n. Tilling.]
 1. To plow and prepare for seed, and to sow, dress, raise crops from, etc., to cultivate; as, to till the earth, a field, a farm.
    No field nolde [would not] tilye.   --P. Plowman.
    the Lord God sent him forth from the garden of Eden, to till the ground from whence he was taken.   --Gen. iii. 23.
 2. To prepare; to get. [Obs.]

From: WordNet (r) 2.0

 till
      n 1: unstratified soil deposited by a glacier; consists of sand
           and clay and gravel and boulders mixed together [syn: boulder
           clay]
      2: a treasury for government funds [syn: public treasury, trough]
      3: a strongbox for holding cash [syn: cashbox, money box]
      v : work land as by ploughing, harrowing, and manuring, in order
          to make it ready for cultivation; "till the soil"