DICT.TW Dictionary Taiwan

Search for: [Show options]

[Pronunciation] [Help] [Database Info] [Server Info]

8 definitions found

From: DICT.TW English-Chinese Dictionary 英漢字典

 stole
 (vbl.)steal的過去式女用披肩,聖衣

From: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913)

 Steal v. t. [imp. Stole p. p. Stolen p. pr. & vb. n. Stealing.]
 1. To take, and carry away, feloniously; to take without right or leave, and with intent to keep wrongfully; as, to steal the personal goods of another.
 Maugre thy heed, thou must for indigence
 Or steal, or beg, or borrow, thy dispense.   --Chaucer.
    The man who stole a goose and gave away the giblets in alms.   --G. Eliot.
 2. To withdraw or convey clandestinely (reflexive); hence, to creep furtively, or to insinuate.
    They could insinuate and steal themselves under the same by their humble carriage and submission.   --Spenser.
    He will steal himself into a man's favor.   --Shak.
 3. To gain by insinuating arts or covert means.
    So Absalom stole the hearts of the men of Israel.   --2 Sam. xv. 6.
 4. To get into one's power gradually and by imperceptible degrees; to take possession of by a gradual and imperceptible appropriation; -- with away.
    Variety of objects has a tendency to steal away the mind from its steady pursuit of any subject.   --I. Watts.
 5. To accomplish in a concealed or unobserved manner; to try to carry out secretly; as, to steal a look.
    Always, when thou changest thine opinion or course, profess it plainly, . . . and do not think to steal it.   --Bacon.
 To steal a march, to march in a covert way; to gain an advantage unobserved; -- formerly followed by of, but now by on or upon, and sometimes by over; as, to steal a march upon one's political rivals.
    She yesterday wanted to steal a march of poor Liddy.   --Smollett.
    Fifty thousand men can not easily steal a march over the sea.   --Walpole.
 Syn: -- To filch; pilfer; purloin; thieve.

From: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913)

 Stole, n.  Bot. A stolon.

From: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913)

 Stole imp. of Steal.

From: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913)

 Stole, n.
 1. A long, loose garment reaching to the feet.
 But when mild morn, in saffron stole,
 First issues from her eastern goal.   --T. Warton.
 2. Eccl. A narrow band of silk or stuff, sometimes enriched with embroidery and jewels, worn on the left shoulder of deacons, and across both shoulders of bishops and priests, pendent on each side nearly to the ground. At Mass, it is worn crossed on the breast by priests. It is used in various sacred functions.
 Groom of the stole, the first lord of the bedchamber in the royal household. [Eng.] --Brande & C.
 

From: WordNet (r) 2.0

 stole
      n : a wide scarf worn about their shoulders by women

From: WordNet (r) 2.0

 steal
      n 1: an advantageous purchase; "she got a bargain at the
           auction"; "the stock was a real buy at that price" [syn:
            bargain, buy]
      2: a stolen base; an instance in which a base runner advances
         safely during the delivery of a pitch (without the help of
         a hit or walk or passed ball or wild pitch)
      v 1: take without the owner's consent; "Someone stole my wallet
           on the train"; "This author stole entire paragraphs from
           my dissertation"
      2: move stealthily; "The ship slipped away in the darkness"
         [syn: slip]
      3: steal a base
      4: to go stealthily or furtively; "..stead of sneaking around
         spying on the neighbor's house" [syn: sneak, mouse, creep,
          pussyfoot]
      [also: stolen, stole]

From: WordNet (r) 2.0

 stole
      See steal