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11 definitions found

From: DICT.TW English-Chinese Dictionary 英漢字典

 wound /ˈwund, ||ˈwaʊnd/
 創傷,傷口,傷疤,傷害,痛苦(vt.)傷害,損害,使受傷(vi.)打傷

From: DICT.TW English-Chinese Medical Dictionary 英漢醫學字典

 wound /ˈwund/ 名詞
 傷,創傷,傷口

From: Network Terminology

 wound
 卷

From: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913)

 Wind v. t. [imp. & p. p. Wound (rarely Winded); p. pr. & vb. n. Winding.]
 1. To turn completely, or with repeated turns; especially, to turn about something fixed; to cause to form convolutions about anything; to coil; to twine; to twist; to wreathe; as, to wind thread on a spool or into a ball.
 Whether to wind
 The woodbine round this arbor.   --Milton.
 2. To entwist; to infold; to encircle.
    Sleep, and I will wind thee in arms.   --Shak.
 3. To have complete control over; to turn and bend at one's pleasure; to vary or alter or will; to regulate; to govern.  “To turn and wind a fiery Pegasus.”
    In his terms so he would him wind.   --Chaucer.
 Gifts blind the wise, and bribes do please
 And wind all other witnesses.   --Herrick.
    Were our legislature vested in the prince, he might wind and turn our constitution at his pleasure.   --Addison.
 4. To introduce by insinuation; to insinuate.
 You have contrived . . . to wind
 Yourself into a power tyrannical.   --Shak.
    Little arts and dexterities they have to wind in such things into discourse.   --Gov. of Tongue.
 5. To cover or surround with something coiled about; as, to wind a rope with twine.
 To wind off, to unwind; to uncoil.
 To wind out, to extricate. [Obs.] --Clarendon.
 To wind up. (a) To coil into a ball or small compass, as a skein of thread; to coil completely. (b) To bring to a conclusion or settlement; as, to wind up one's affairs; to wind up an argument. (c) To put in a state of renewed or continued motion, as a clock, a watch, etc., by winding the spring, or that which carries the weight; hence, to prepare for continued movement or action; to put in order anew.  “Fate seemed to wind him up for fourscore years.” --Dryden. “Thus they wound up his temper to a pitch.” --Atterbury. (d) To tighten (the strings) of a musical instrument, so as to tune it. Wind up the slackened strings of thy lute.” --Waller.

From: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913)

 Wind v. t.  [imp. & p. p. Wound R. Winded; p. pr. & vb. n. Winding.] To blow; to sound by blowing; esp., to sound with prolonged and mutually involved notes.  “Hunters who wound their horns.”
 Ye vigorous swains, while youth ferments your blood, . . .
 Wind the shrill horn.   --Pope.
    That blast was winded by the king.   --Sir W. Scott.
 

From: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913)

 Wound v. t. [imp. & p. p. Wounded; p. pr. & vb. n. Wounding.]
 1. To hurt by violence; to produce a breach, or separation of parts, in, as by a cut, stab, blow, or the like.
    The archers hit him; and he was sore wounded of the archers.   --1 Sam. xxxi. 3.
 2. To hurt the feelings of; to pain by disrespect, ingratitude, or the like; to cause injury to.
    When ye sin so against the brethren, and wound their weak conscience, ye sin against Christ.   --1 Cor. viii. 12.
 

From: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913)

 Wound imp. & p. p. of Wind to twist, and Wind to sound by blowing.

From: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913)

 Wound n.
 1. A hurt or injury caused by violence; specifically, a breach of the skin and flesh of an animal, or in the substance of any creature or living thing; a cut, stab, rent, or the like.
 Showers of blood
 Rained from the wounds of slaughtered Englishmen.   --Shak.
 2. Fig.: An injury, hurt, damage, detriment, or the like, to feeling, faculty, reputation, etc.
 3. Criminal Law An injury to the person by which the skin is divided, or its continuity broken; a lesion of the body, involving some solution of continuity.
 Note:Walker condemns the pronunciation woond as a “capricious novelty.” It is certainly opposed to an important principle of our language, namely, that the Old English long sound written ou, and pronounced like French ou or modern English oo, has regularly changed, when accented, into the diphthongal sound usually written with the same letters ou in modern English, as in ground, hound, round, sound. The use of ou in Old English to represent the sound of modern English oo was borrowed from the French, and replaced the older and Anglo-Saxon spelling with u. It makes no difference whether the word was taken from the French or not, provided it is old enough in English to have suffered this change to what is now the common sound of ou; but words taken from the French at a later time, or influenced by French, may have the French sound.
 Wound gall Zool., an elongated swollen or tuberous gall on the branches of the grapevine, caused by a small reddish brown weevil (Ampeloglypter sesostris) whose larvae inhabit the galls.

From: WordNet (r) 2.0

 wind
      n 1: air moving (sometimes with considerable force) from an area
           of high pressure to an area of low pressure; "trees bent
           under the fierce winds"; "when there is no wind, row";
           "the radioactivity was being swept upwards by the air
           current and out into the atmosphere" [syn: air current,
            current of air]
      2: a tendency or force that influences events; "the winds of
         change"
      3: breath; "the collision knocked the wind out of him"
      4: empty rhetoric or insincere or exaggerated talk; "that's a
         lot of wind"; "don't give me any of that jazz" [syn: idle
         words, jazz, nothingness]
      5: an indication of potential opportunity; "he got a tip on the
         stock market"; "a good lead for a job" [syn: tip, lead,
          steer, confidential information, hint]
      6: a musical instrument in which the sound is produced by an
         enclosed column of air that is moved by the breath [syn: wind
         instrument]
      7: a reflex that expels intestinal gas through the anus [syn: fart,
          farting, flatus, breaking wind]
      8: the act of winding or twisting; "he put the key in the old
         clock and gave it a good wind" [syn: winding, twist]
      v 1: to move or cause to move in a sinuous, spiral, or circular
           course; "the river winds through the hills"; "the path
           meanders through the vineyards"; "sometimes, the gout
           wanders through the entire body" [syn: weave, thread,
            meander, wander]
      2: extend in curves and turns; "The road winds around the lake"
         [syn: curve]
      3: wrap or coil around; "roll your hair around your finger";
         "Twine the thread around the spool" [syn: wrap, roll,
         twine] [ant: unwind]
      4: catch the scent of; get wind of; "The dog nosed out the
         drugs" [syn: scent, nose]
      5: coil the spring of (some mechanical device) by turning a
         stem; "wind your watch" [syn: wind up]
      6: form into a wreath [syn: wreathe]
      7: raise or haul up with or as if with mechanical help; "hoist
         the bicycle onto the roof of the car" [syn: hoist, lift]
      [also: wound]

From: WordNet (r) 2.0

 wound
      adj : put in a coil
      n 1: any break in the skin or an organ caused by violence or
           surgical incision [syn: lesion]
      2: a casualty to military personnel resulting from combat [syn:
          injury, combat injury]
      3: a figurative injury (to your feelings or pride); "he feared
         that mentioning it might reopen the wound"; "deep in her
         breast lives the silent wound"; "The right reader of a
         good poem can tell the moment it strikes him that he has
         taken an immortal wound--that he will never get over
         it"--Robert Frost
      4: the act of inflicting a wound [syn: wounding]
      v 1: cause injuries or bodily harm to [syn: injure]
      2: hurt the feelings of; "She hurt me when she did not include
         me among her guests"; "This remark really bruised me ego"
         [syn: hurt, injure, bruise, offend, spite]

From: WordNet (r) 2.0

 wound
      See wind