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2 definitions found

From: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913)

 Spi·der n.
 1. Zool. Any one of numerous species of arachnids comprising the order Araneina. Spiders have the mandibles converted into poison fangs, or falcers. The abdomen is large and not segmented, with two or three pairs of spinnerets near the end, by means of which they spin threads of silk to form cocoons, or nests, to protect their eggs and young. Many species spin also complex webs to entrap the insects upon which they prey. The eyes are usually eight in number (rarely six), and are situated on the back of the cephalothorax. See Illust. under Araneina.
 Note:Spiders are divided into two principal groups: the Dipneumona, having two lungs: and the Tetrapneumona, having four lungs. See Mygale. The former group includes several tribes; as, the jumping spiders (see Saltigradae), the wolf spiders, or Citigradae (see under Wolf), the crab spiders, or Laterigradae (see under Crab), the garden, or geometric, spiders, or Orbitellae (see under Geometrical, and Garden), and others. See Bird spider, under Bird, Grass spider, under Grass, House spider, under House, Silk spider, under Silk.
 2. Zool. Any one of various other arachnids resembling the true spiders, especially certain mites, as the red spider (see under Red).
 3. An iron pan with a long handle, used as a kitchen utensil in frying food. Originally, it had long legs, and was used over coals on the hearth.
 4. A trevet to support pans or pots over a fire.
 5. Mach. A skeleton, or frame, having radiating arms or members, often connected by crosspieces; as, a casting forming the hub and spokes to which the rim of a fly wheel or large gear is bolted; the body of a piston head; a frame for strengthening a core or mold for a casting, etc.
 Spider ant. Zool. Same as Solitary ant, under Solitary.
 Spider crab Zool., any one of numerous species of maioid crabs having a more or less triangular body and ten long legs. Some of the species grow to great size, as the great Japanese spider crab (Macrocheira Kempferi), measuring sometimes more than fifteen feet across the legs when they are extended.
 Spider fly Zool., any one of numerous species of parasitic dipterous insects of the family Hippoboscidae. They are mostly destitute of wings, and live among the feathers of birds and the hair of bats. Called also bird tick, and bat tick.
 Spider hunter Zool., any one of several species of East Indian sunbirds of the genus Arachnothera.
 Spider lines, filaments of a spider's web crossing the field of vision in optical instruments; -- used for determining the exact position of objects and making delicate measurements. Fine wires, silk fibers, or lines on glass similarly placed, are called spider lines.
 Spider mite. Zool. (a) Any one of several species of parasitic mites of the genus Argas and allied genera. See Argas. (b) Any one of numerous small mites injurious to plants.
 Spider monkey Zool., any one of numerous species of South American monkeys of the genus Ateles, having very long legs and a long prehensile tail.
 Spider orchis Bot., a European orchidaceous plant (Ophrys aranifera), having flowers which resemble spiders.
 Spider shell Zool., any shell of the genus Pteroceras. See Pteroceras.
 

From: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913)

 House n.; pl. Houses
 1. A structure intended or used as a habitation or shelter for animals of any kind; but especially, a building or edifice for the habitation of man; a dwelling place, a mansion.
    Houses are built to live in; not to look on.   --Bacon.
 Bees with smoke and doves with noisome stench
 Are from their hives and houses driven away.   --Shak.
 2. Household affairs; domestic concerns; particularly in the phrase to keep house. See below.
 3. Those who dwell in the same house; a household.
    One that feared God with all his house.   --Acts x. 2.
 4. A family of ancestors, descendants, and kindred; a race of persons from the same stock; a tribe; especially, a noble family or an illustrious race; as, the house of Austria; the house of Hanover; the house of Israel.
 The last remaining pillar of their house,
 The one transmitter of their ancient name.   --Tennyson.
 5. One of the estates of a kingdom or other government assembled in parliament or legislature; a body of men united in a legislative capacity; as, the House of Lords; the House of Commons; the House of Representatives; also, a quorum of such a body. See Congress, and Parliament.
 6. Com. A firm, or commercial establishment.
 7. A public house; an inn; a hotel.
 8. Astrol. A twelfth part of the heavens, as divided by six circles intersecting at the north and south points of the horizon, used by astrologers in noting the positions of the heavenly bodies, and casting horoscopes or nativities. The houses were regarded as fixed in respect to the horizon, and numbered from the one at the eastern horizon, called the ascendant, first house, or house of life, downward, or in the direction of the earth's revolution, the stars and planets passing through them in the reverse order every twenty-four hours.
 9. A square on a chessboard, regarded as the proper place of a piece.
 10. An audience; an assembly of hearers, as at a lecture, a theater, etc.; as, a thin or a full house.
 11. The body, as the habitation of the soul.
 This mortal house I'll ruin,
 Do Cæsar what he can.   --Shak.
 12. Usage: [With an adj., as narrow, dark, etc.] The grave. “The narrow house.”
 Note:House is much used adjectively and as the first element of compounds. The sense is usually obvious; as, house cricket, housemaid, house painter, housework.
 House ant Zool., a very small, yellowish brown ant (Myrmica molesta), which often infests houses, and sometimes becomes a great pest.
 House of bishops Prot. Epis. Ch., one of the two bodies composing a general convertion, the other being House of Clerical and Lay Deputies.
 House boat, a covered boat used as a dwelling.
 House of call, a place, usually a public house, where journeymen connected with a particular trade assemble when out of work, ready for the call of employers. [Eng.] --Simonds.
 House car Railroad, a freight car with inclosing sides and a roof; a box car.
 House of correction. See Correction.
 House cricket Zool., a European cricket (Gryllus domesticus), which frequently lives in houses, between the bricks of chimneys and fireplaces. It is noted for the loud chirping or stridulation of the males.
 House dog, a dog kept in or about a dwelling house.
 House finch Zool., the burion.
 House flag, a flag denoting the commercial house to which a merchant vessel belongs.
 House fly Zool., a common fly (esp. Musca domestica), which infests houses both in Europe and America. Its larva is a maggot which lives in decaying substances or excrement, about sink drains, etc.
 House of God, a temple or church.
 House of ill fame. See Ill fame under Ill, a.
 House martin Zool., a common European swallow (Hirundo urbica). It has feathered feet, and builds its nests of mud against the walls of buildings. Called also house swallow, and window martin.
 House mouse Zool., the common mouse (Mus musculus).
 House physician, the resident medical adviser of a hospital or other public institution.
 House snake Zool., the milk snake.
 House sparrow Zool., the common European sparrow (Passer domesticus). It has recently been introduced into America, where it has become very abundant, esp. in cities. Called also thatch sparrow.
 House spider Zool., any spider which habitually lives in houses. Among the most common species are Theridium tepidariorum and Tegenaria domestica.
 House surgeon, the resident surgeon of a hospital.
 House wren Zool., the common wren of the Eastern United States (Troglodytes aëdon). It is common about houses and in gardens, and is noted for its vivacity, and loud musical notes. See Wren.
 Religious house, a monastery or convent.
 The White House, the official residence of the President of the United States; -- hence, colloquially, the office of President.
 To bring down the house. See under Bring.
 To keep house, to maintain an independent domestic establishment.
 To keep open house, to entertain friends at all times.
 Syn: -- Dwelling; residence; abode. See Tenement.